New Infrared Photos From James Webb Telescope's 'Pillars of Creation' Reveal Star-Creating Cosmic Dust and Huge Galaxy Clusters

New Infrared Photos From James Webb Telescope’s ‘Pillars of Creation’ Reveal Star-Creating Cosmic Dust and Huge Galaxy Clusters

NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope mid-infrared view of the Pillars of Creation.NASA, ESA, CSA, STScI, Joseph DePasquale (STScI), Alyssa Pagan (STScI)

  • The James Webb Space Telescope released a new mid-infrared view of the Pillars of Creation on Friday.

  • The image allowed scientists to see the amount of cosmic dust – needed to create stars – in the region.

  • Additional images released this month include the pair of galaxies VV 191 and cosmic dust that looks like tree rings.

The James Webb Space Telescope released a new mid-infrared view of the “pillars of creation” on Friday, revealing two types of stars and giving researchers the chance to study cosmic dust in the massive columns of gas.

NASA's James Webb Space Telescope mid-infrared view of the Pillars of Creation.

NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope mid-infrared view of the Pillars of Creation.NASA, ESA, CSA, STScI, Joseph DePasquale (STScI), Alyssa Pagan (STScI)

The new photos included a cluster of stars 5.6 billion light-years away. Light from the MACS0647-JD system is bent and amplified by the massive gravity of the MACS0647 galaxy cluster.

photo of the Webb Space Telescope

The massive gravity of the MACS0647 galaxy cluster acts as a cosmic lens to bend and amplify light from the more distant MACS0647-JD system. He also tripled the JD system, causing his image to appear in three separate locations. These images, which are highlighted with white boxes, are labeled JD1, JD2 and JD3; magnified views are shown in the panels to the right. In this image from Webb’s Near Infrared Camera (NIRCam) instrument, blue has been assigned to the 1.15 and 1.5 micron wavelengths (F115W, F150W), green to the 2.0 and 2.77 microns (F200W, F277W) and red at wavelengths of 3.65 and 4.44 microns (F365W, F444W).SCIENCE: NASA, ESA, CSA, Dan Coe (STScI), Rebecca Larson (UT), Yu-Yang Hsiao (JHU) IMAGE PROCESSING: Alyssa Pagan (STScI)

Earlier this month, the latest photos from the “Pillars of Creation” were released, revealing a sky filled with stars previously invisible to fainter telescopes.

The Pillars of Creation are highlighted in a kaleidoscope of color in the near infrared light view of NASA's James Webb Space Telescope.  The pillars look like bows and arrows emerging from a desert landscape, but are filled with semi-transparent, ever-changing gas and dust.  It's a region where young stars are forming — or just emerging from their dusty cocoons as they continue to form.

The Pillars of Creation are highlighted in a kaleidoscope of color in the near infrared light view of NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope. The pillars look like bows and arrows emerging from a desert landscape, but are filled with semi-transparent, ever-changing gas and dust. It’s a region where young stars are forming — or just emerging from their dusty cocoons as they continue to form.NASA, ESA, CSA, STScI; Joseph DePasquale (STScI), Anton M. Koekemoer (STScI), Alyssa Pagan (STScI).

A side-by-side comparison shows the additional detail revealed by the James Webb Space Telescope, compared to the 2014 Hubble Space Telescope image.

NASA's Hubble Space Telescope made the Pillars of Creation famous with its first image in 1995, but revisited the scene in 2014 to reveal a sharper, wider view in visible light, pictured above left.  A new view in near-infrared light from NASA's James Webb Space Telescope, right, helps us see through more dust in this star-forming region.  The thick, dusty brown pillars are no longer as opaque, and many more red stars that are still forming appear.

NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope made the Pillars of Creation famous with its first image in 1995, but revisited the scene in 2014 to reveal a sharper, wider view in visible light, pictured above left. A new view in near-infrared light from NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope, right, helps us see through more dust in this star-forming region. The thick, dusty brown pillars are no longer as opaque, and many more red stars that are still forming appear.NASA, ESA, CSA, STScI; Joseph DePasquale (STScI), Anton M. Koekemoer (STScI), Alyssa Pagan (STScI).

Cosmic dust in the sky has created a ripple that looks like tree rings, visible around Wolf-Rayet 140, a binary star system.

Shells of cosmic dust created by the interaction of binary stars appear as rings around Wolf-Rayet 140.

Shells of cosmic dust created by the interaction of binary stars appear as rings around Wolf-Rayet 140.NASA, ESA, CSA, STScI, NASA-JPL, Caltech

Near-infrared light from Webb and ultraviolet and visible light from Hubble show “interacting” galaxies that are actually very far away.

This image of galaxy pair VV 191 includes near-infrared light from Webb and ultraviolet and visible light from Hubble.

This image of galaxy pair VV 191 includes near-infrared light from Webb and ultraviolet and visible light from Hubble.NASA, ESA, CSA, Rogier Windhorst (ASU), William Keel (University of Alabama), Stuart Wyithe (University of Melbourne), JWST PEARLS Team, Alyssa Pagan (STScI)

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